#SummerHours Summer Reading: Women in Early Hollywood

#SummerHours Summer Reading: Women in Early Hollywood

Throughout history, and specifically film and television history, women have been early to identify and seize opportunity in emerging fields—only to be edged out of those fields, and their history, once they become mainstream. Mellini Kantayya shares four great reads about the women pioneers of early Hollywood. Continue reading #SummerHours Summer Reading: Women in Early Hollywood

<i>Camerawoman Angela Murray Gibson Films Herself into History, 1921-1925</i>: Marsha Gordon and Buckey Grimm

Camerawoman Angela Murray Gibson Films Herself into History, 1921-1925: Marsha Gordon and Buckey Grimm

Angela Murray Gibson, a silent era filmmaker receives due attention at Orphan Film Symposium’s line-up this April 11th – 14th, 2018 at the Museum of Moving Image. That Ice Ticket (1921), a recent NYWIFT Women’s Film Preservation Fund and Kino Lorber preservation, will screen on April 13th as part of the presentation, Camerawoman Angela Murray Gibson Films Herself into History, 1921-1925. Here, its presenters Marsha Gordon and Buckey Grimm offer some insights into this distinguishing filmmaker and her broader mark on American cinema. Continue reading Camerawoman Angela Murray Gibson Films Herself into History, 1921-1925: Marsha Gordon and Buckey Grimm

Trailblazing through the Decades: Cheryl Dunye (1990s)

Trailblazing through the Decades: Cheryl Dunye (1990s)

Twenty years ago a young artist set out to make a documentary about women like herself: black queer filmmakers. She found nothing but homophobia and omission, and then… inspiration. The resulting film The Watermelon Woman marked Cheryl Dunye’s 1996 debut – a hybrid of autobiography, documentary, and comedy. It defies categorization and was the first feature film directed by an African American lesbian. Continue reading Trailblazing through the Decades: Cheryl Dunye (1990s)

Trailblazing Through the Decades: Jessie Maple (1980s)

Trailblazing Through the Decades: Jessie Maple (1980s)

Jessie Maple is the first black woman to join the union of International Photographers of Motion Picture & Television (IATSE) in New York. Her book, How to Become a Union Camerawoman , is an instructional guide illustrating the obstacles that she endured to get into the union. It details the court case she initiated to fight discrimination after she became a member. Continue reading Trailblazing Through the Decades: Jessie Maple (1980s)

Trailblazing Through the Decades: Ida Lupino (1950s)

Trailblazing Through the Decades: Ida Lupino (1950s)

British-American actress and producer Ida Lupino, got her start directing when the director of the 1949 film Not Wanted suffered a heart attack during pre-production. Lupino stepped in and shot the film guerilla style to keep the movie on budget and on schedule. Budgeted at just over $150,000, the film grossed $1 million, and Lupino’s reputation spread through Hollywood studios even though the original director retained credit. Continue reading Trailblazing Through the Decades: Ida Lupino (1950s)

Trailblazing through the Decades: Esther Eng (1930s)

Trailblazing through the Decades: Esther Eng (1930s)

In honor of Women’s History Month, NYWIFT looks back at some of the remarkable women who have shaped the film, television and digital media industries through the decades. We kick off the series in the 1930s. Esther Eng was a film director who also worked as a writer, producer, and distributor. She had an international career, making films both in the United States and Hong Kong. She was the first woman to direct Chinese language films in the U.S. Continue reading Trailblazing through the Decades: Esther Eng (1930s)

One Big Union: A History of the Wobblies

One Big Union: A History of the Wobblies

Many have never heard of “Wobblies” or the Industrial Workers of the World (IWW), but in the early 1900s, The Wobblies were laborers working in a variety of fields, who joined the movement which became known as “industrial unionism” under the IWW organization and they made headlines.

70 plus years following the founding of IWW, filmmakers Deborah Shaffer and Stewart Bird came together to bring the story of early American industrial radical labor reform back into the spotlight. Their documentary, The Wobblies (1979), shows the relevance of this history that still holds true today. The WFPF will screen the film at UNDO on January 28. Continue reading One Big Union: A History of the Wobblies

The WFPF Screens Four Experimental Films at MoMA’s “To Save and Project” Festival on January 22

The WFPF Screens Four Experimental Films at MoMA’s “To Save and Project” Festival on January 22

The Women’s Film Preservation Fund: Four Experimental Films will screen January 22nd in The Museum of Modern Art’s annual festival, To Save and Project.  The four recently preserved films by Barbara Hammer, Victoria Hochberg, Peggy Ahwesh, and Sheila Paige, all carry a common thread of movement towards a future from the past.  WFPF Co-Chair Ann Deborah Levy gives us a preview. Continue reading The WFPF Screens Four Experimental Films at MoMA’s “To Save and Project” Festival on January 22